Workshop

European Molecular Biology Organization

HEDGEHOG SIGNALING:

From developmental biology

to anti-cancer drugs

 

 

 

 

 



27 - 31 March | 2010 |St. Jean Cap Ferrat| France

Programme

 

Dowload final programme: (pdf)

 

Sessions:       | 2   | |  4     |    |  7   8   |  9   |  10

 

 

Saturday 27th March

 

12:00-14:50

Arrival and registration

 

14:50 -16:45

Session 1: Secretion and Movement I

 

 

Chairs: 
Suzanne Eaton , Satyajit Mayor

 

14:50 - 15:00

Welcome Address

 

15:00 - 15:30

P. P. Thérond, IBDC, Nice, France

Regulation of the Hedgehog long range activity in Drosophila.

 

15:30-16:00

S. Eaton, Max Planck Institute, Dresden, Germany

Really long-range Hedgehog signaling.

 

16:00 - 16:30

H. Roelink, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Long-range transport of SHh.

 

16:30 - 16:45

B. Glise, CBD, Université Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse, France
Role of the HSPG modifying enzyme, DSulf1, in modulating Hedgehog morphogen gradient.

 

16:45-17:30

Coffee break

 

17.30 - 19:00

Session 1 Continued

17:00-18:00          

I. Guerrero, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid
Cytoneme-mediated transport of exovesicles containing Hedgehog in the Drosophila wing disc

 

18:00-18:30                

S. Mayor, Tata Institute, Bangalore, India

Hierarchical organization of Hh and its role in signaling.

 

18:30 - 19:00

T. Kornberg, UCSF, San Francisco, USA

Mechanisms of morphogen dispersion and signal transduction.

 
19.30 Dinner  

21.00 - late

COCKTAILS AND SOCIAL EVENT

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Sunday 28th March    
     

9.00 - 10.30

Session 2:

Secretion and Movement II

 
 

Chairs: 
Philip Beachy, Patrick Mehlen

 

9:00-9:30

P. A. Beachy, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA

 

9:30-10:00

J. Jiang, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA

Kinase regulation of Smoothened signaling.

 

10:00 - 10:15    

B. Allen, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA

Essential and opposing roles for cell surface Hh-binding proteins during mouse embryogenesis.

10:15 - 10:30

C. Siebold, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

Structural mechanism of hedgehog ligand sequestration by the human hedgehog-interacting protein Hip.

10.30 - 11:15

Coffee Break

 
11:15 - 12.045

Session 2 (continued)

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11:15 - 11:45    

P. Mehlen, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France

SHH and the dependence receptor notion.

 
11:45 - 12:15 

A. Plessis, Jacques Monod Institute, Paris, France

Dynamics and homeostasis of the Hedgehog receptor Patched: Regulation by E3 Ubiquitin ligases

12:15 - 12:30

A. Casali, IBMB-CSIC, Barcelona, Spain

Self–induced Patched receptor degradation adjusts cell sensitivity to the Hedgehog morphogen gradient.

 

12:30 - 12:45

D. Leahy, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA

Structure of the N-terminal protein domain of Dally-like protein.

 

12:45 14:00

LUNCH

 

14:00 - 16:00 Free Time  

16:00 - 17:00

Session 3:

Ligand reception and signal transduction II

a

 

Chairs: 
Henk Roelink, Elisa Marti

 

16:00 - 16:30

X. Lin, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Cincinnati, USA

Two cell-surface proteins Dally-like and Ihog differentially regulate Hh signalling strength and range during development.

 

16:30 - 16:45

K. Ayers, IDBC, Nice, France

The glypican Dally and the hydrolase Notum regulate the switch between high and low level intracellular Hedgehog pathway signalling.

 

16:45 - 17:00

J. Filmus, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Canada

Glypican-5 stimulates rhabdomyosarcoma cell proliferation by activating hedgehog signaling.

 

17:00 - 17:45

Coffee Break

 

17:45 - 19:00

Session 3 continued

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17:45 - 18:15

D. J. Robbins, University of Miami, Miami, USA

Models of Hedgehog signaling.
 

18:15 - 18:30

B. Wang, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA

Suppressor of fused and SPOP regulate the stability and function of Gli2 and Gli3 full-length activators but not their repressors.

 

18:30 - 18:45

M.A. Price, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology,Okinawa,Japan

The mechanism of Ci repressor formation.

 

18:45 - 19:00

K. Nybakken, Boston Biomedical Research Inst., Boston, USA

Regulation of Hh signaling by acetylation.

 

19:30

DINNER

 

21:00

POSTER SESSION I All Numbers

 
     

Monday 29th March

 

 

     

8:45 - 10:15

Session 4:

Hedgehog Signaling in Development and Regeneration I

a

 

Chairs:
Philip Ingham, Muriel Perron

 

8:45 - 9:15

J. Briscoe, NIMR, London, UK

The gene regulatory logic for reading the sonic Hedgehog gradient in the vertebrate neural tube.

 

9:15 - 9:45

P. W. Ingham, IMCB, Singapore

Cell fate specification in the zebrafish myotome: a paradigm for Hedgehog signalling activity.

 

9:45 - 10:15

A. P. McMahon, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA

Exploring the regulatory network underlying HH-generated neural diversity.

 

10:15-11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:00-12:15

Session 4: Continued

a

11:00-11:30

C. Tickle, University of Dundee, UK

Hedgehog signalling in vertebrate limb development.

 

11:30-12:00

E. Marti, CSIC, Barcelona, Spain

Patterning and proliferation of neural progenitors cells requires integration of Wnt and Sonic hedgehog activities
 

12:00 - 12:15

C. Chiang, Vanderbildt University, Nashville, USA

Transventricular delivery of Sonic hedgehog is essential to cerebellar ventricular zone development.

 

12:15-13:45

LUNCH

 

13:45 - 16:30

OUTING: Villa Ephrussi de Rothschild museum and gardens

 

16:30 - 17:00

Coffee Break

 

17:00 - 18:00

Session 5:

Hedgehog Signaling in Development II

a

 

Chairs:

James Briscoe, Cherryl Tickle

 

17:00 - 17:30

F. Charron, IRCM, Montréal, Canada

Wiring the brain: Hedgehog signaling and neural circuit formation.
 

17:30 - 18:00

M. Perron, Université Paris XI, Orsay, France

Control of post-embryonic neurogenesis in the retina by a balance between Hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways
 

18:00 - 20:00

POSTER SESSION II (odd numbers)

 

20:00

DINNER

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Tuesday 30th March

 

 

     

8:45-10:15

Session 6:

Hedgehog and Primary Cilia I

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Chairs:

Alexandra Joyner, Jeremy Reiter

 

8:45-9:15

K. Anderson, Sloan-Kettering Institute, Cambridge, USA

Cilia and Hedgehog signaling in the mouse embryo
 

9:15-9:45

P.-T. Chuang, UCSF, San Francisco, USA

Cilium-dependent and -independent processes in mammalian Hedgehog signaling.

 

9:45-10:00

L. Milenkovic, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA

Tracing Smoothened to the primary cilium

 

10:00-10:15

M. Bijlsma, University of California, Berkeley, USA

Ciliary function is not required for non-canonical Hedgehog signal transduction.

 

10:15-11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:00-12:00

 Session 6: Continued

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11.00-11.30

J. Reiter, UCSF, San Francisco, USA

Primary cilia can both mediate and suppress Hedgehog pathway–dependent tumorigenesis.

 

11:30-11:45

J. Eggenschweiler, Princeton University, Princeton, USA

Broad-minded links ciliary assembly, cell cycle-related kinase function, and mammalian Hedgehog signaling.

 

11:45 - 12:00

S. Schneider-Maunoury, CNRS UMR7622, Paris, France

Disruption of the ciliary gene Ftm/Rpgrip1l causes telencephalic patterning and morphogenesis defects by preventing the formation of Gli3R.

 

12:00-14:00

LUNCH

 

14:00 - 15:00 FREE TIME  

15:00-16:15

Session 7:

Hedgehog in Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells I

Brain Tumorigenesis

 

 

Chairs:

Kathryn Anderson, Rune Toftgård

 

15:00-15:30

A. Gulino, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy

Regulation of Hedgehog/Gli function in cerebellar stem/progenitor and medulloblastoma cells

 

15:30 - 16:00

A. Ruiz i Altaba, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

The GLI code in cancer stem cells.

 

16:00 - 16:15

A. Kenney, MSKCC, New York, USA

Sonic Hedgehog: Hippo pathway cross-talk in neural precursor proliferation and pediatric brain tumorigenesis.

a

16:15-16:45

Coffee Break

 

16:45-18:15

Session 7: continued

 

16:45 - 17:15

A. L. Joyner, Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA

Gli1 as a tool to study skin homeostasis, wound repair, and cancer.

 

17:15 - 17:45

M. P. Scott, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA

Target gene regulation by Gli1.

 

17:45-18:15

F. Aberger, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria

Cooperative Hedgehog/GLI signaling in cancer

 

18:15 - 20:15

POSTER SESSION III Even Numbers

 

20:30

DINNER

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 31th March

 

 

     

8:45 - 10:15

Session 8:

Hedgehog in Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells II  

Skin and other tumors

 a

 

Chairs:

Alberto Gulino, Ariel Ruiz Altaba

 

08:45 - 09:15

R. Toftgård, Karolinska Institute,Huddinge, Sweden
Hedgehog signalling in skin and pancreatic cancer.

 

9:15 - 9:45

A. Oro, Stanford University, Palo Alto, USA

Dermal requirements for sonic Hedgehog signaling during hair follicle morphogenesis.

 

9:45 - 10:00

B. Stecca, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Florence, Italy

Hedgehog-GLI signaling is essential for melanoma stem cell survival.

 

10:00 - 10:15

J. Sage, Stanford, Palo Alto, USA

Cell-autonomous role for Hedgehog signaling in small cell lung carcinoma.

 

10:15-11:00

Coffee Break

 

11:00-12:15

Session 9:

Hedgehog in Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells III

Clinical trials

a

 

Chairs:

Frederic de Sauvage, Isabel Guerrero

 

11:00-11:30

F. de Sauvage, Genentech Inc, San Francisco, USA

Targeting the Hedgehog pathway in cancer.

 

11:30-11:45

K. McGovern, Infinity Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, USA

Activity of a Smoothened inhibitor, IPI-926, in ligand-dependent and ligand-independent tumors.

 

11:45 - 12:00

K. Bennett, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Lawrenceville, USA

Characterization of BMS-833923 (XL139), a Hedgehog (HH) pathway inhibitor in early clinical development.
 
12:00 - 12:15

S. Buonamici, Novartis, Cambridge, USA

Resistance to smoothened antagonists can be abrogated by PI3K pathway inhibition.

 
     

12:30

END OF THE MEETING

 

 

 

 

12:30-14:00

LUNCH AND DEPARTURE

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