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Protein transport systems:
Protein targeting and translocation

30 Sept - 5 Oct | 2006 | Gdansk|Poland



 


Supported by FEBS
Youth Travel Grants
FEBS

Registration deadline: July 15th, 2006

Protein trafficking and translocation are essential processes in even the simplest living cells. Many proteins have to cross from one up to as many as five membranes to reach their destination. The compartmentalisation of the eukaryotic cell, with its division of labour principle in cellular organelles (compartments), relies entirely on high fidelity sorting and translocation systems. Surprisingly, multiple pathways have evolved to translocate different proteins across the same membrane according to their specific properties (folded or unfolded, presence or absence of hydrophobic segments, etc).

Some transport pathways are universally conserved; others that developed in bacteria are found in present-day organelles that originated by endosymbiosis, while yet others evolved specifically in eukaryotes to deal with the unique problems arising from the transfer of genetic information from the endosymbiont to the host nucleus.  Most of protein translocation nanomachines are highly sophisticated, comprising multiple receptors, motors, checkpoints, gated channels and complex regulatory circuits.

The immense significance of protein translocation in the overall field of molecular and cellular biology will attract researchers from different fields to address key questions concerning these complex systems. The cross-discipline research that is an essential component of present-day research to understand these different aspects is reflected in the different expertise and scientific backgrounds of the scientists invited to attend this meeting.

We will focus on bacterial outer and plasma membranes, the endoplasmic reticulum, the peroxisomal membrane and the membranes of mitochondria and chloroplasts. The proposed meeting will focus on new, primarily mechanistic and structural developments, the evolution of transport systems and the cooperation oftranslocation machineries, as well as their specificity and the biochemical and molecular basis of single enzyme function.